The Programme is implemented by means of annual work programmes agreed with countries on a number of annually defined priority actions and the criteria for funding actions under the programme. On this basis, the Consumers Health Agriculture and Food Executive Agency (Chafea) organises calls for proposals for projects and operating grants, as well as calls for joint action and tenders. Direct grants are signed with international organisations active in the area of health.
The Programme is implemented by means of annual work programmes agreed with countries on a number of annually defined priority actions and the criteria for funding actions under the programme. On this basis, the Consumers Health Agriculture and Food Executive Agency (Chafea) organises calls for proposals for projects and operating grants, as well as calls for joint action and tenders. Direct grants are signed with international organisations active in the area of health.
The premise of body cleansing is based on the Ancient Egyptian and Greek idea of autointoxication, in which foods consumed or in the humoral theory of health that the four humours themselves can putrefy and produce toxins that harm the body. Biochemistry and microbiology appeared to support the theory in the 19th century, but by the early twentieth century, detoxification based approaches quickly fell out of favour.[6][7] Despite abandonment by mainstream medicine, the idea has persisted in the popular imagination and amongst alternative medicine practitioners.[8][9][10] In recent years, notions of body cleansing have undergone something of a resurgence, along with many other alternative medical approaches. Nonetheless, mainstream medicine continues to view the field as unscientific and anachronistic.[9]
The premise of body cleansing is based on the Ancient Egyptian and Greek idea of autointoxication, in which foods consumed or in the humoral theory of health that the four humours themselves can putrefy and produce toxins that harm the body. Biochemistry and microbiology appeared to support the theory in the 19th century, but by the early twentieth century, detoxification based approaches quickly fell out of favour.[6][7] Despite abandonment by mainstream medicine, the idea has persisted in the popular imagination and amongst alternative medicine practitioners.[8][9][10] In recent years, notions of body cleansing have undergone something of a resurgence, along with many other alternative medical approaches. Nonetheless, mainstream medicine continues to view the field as unscientific and anachronistic.[9]
So many people improved their health and got off medications just by following one man. It was also inspirational that Joe could help himself, log his journey and influence thousands of people to do the same. I’m sure there are now many thousands of people that have gone through his program to some degree or another. Some people did the 30-day program but I only did 2 days.

Body cleansing and detoxification have been referred to as an elaborate hoax used by con artists to cure nonexistent illnesses. Most doctors contend that the 'toxins' in question do not even exist.[16][17] In response, alternative medicine proponents frequently cite heavy metals or pesticides as the source of toxification, however no evidence exists that detoxification approaches have a measurable effect on these or any other chemical levels. Medical experts state that body cleansing is unnecessary as the human body is naturally capable of maintaining itself, with several organs dedicated to cleansing the blood and gut.[18]
Sleep and meditation. Try to avoid high intensity exercising like running and weight-lifting. The more your body is working, the more energy you'll lose. Take the time to relax, stretch (keeps your blood circulation to better remove toxins), and use the time to reflect. Ask yourself why you're doing this, and empower your will to finish. Drink lots of water, nap, and go to bed early. Avoid watching TV because it'll disrupt your consciousness and make you hungry (due to all the food commercials).
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